The BEAT News

Letter from Sierra Club Director
Responding to Charlottesville

This weekend’s events in Charlottesville were horrifying. Violent racists beat, harassed, and murdered peaceful protesters speaking out to stop hate from gaining another inch in our country. This was a direct assault not only on our values of inclusion as Americans, but also an attack on our democracy and peaceful protest itself. The Sierra Club has a long history of marching for justice, for clean air, water, and the climate. We can’t continue that legacy while violent radicals attack any of us. FROM THE SIERRA CLUB <more>

The perks of planting trees
(And the challenge of finding places for them)

PITTSFIELD — More trees in Pittsfield will bring down energy costs, but the program tasked with planting them is having trouble taking root. The neighborhoods targeted for planting in the Gateway Cities program lack tree cover and are largely low-income, and residents of those areas can benefit the most from reduced energy costs, said Kurt Gaertner, director of land policy at the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs. The state Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs aims to have 2,400 trees planted in the city of Pittsfield by the spring of 2019. But as many trees as there are to plant, the Berkshire Environmental Action Team is having a difficult time finding homeowners who could use them.  FROM THE BERKSHIRE EAGLE <more>

10 Arrested Wednesday Forming Human Barricade to Block Pipeline Workers and Construction Vehicles in Consideration of Public Safety

In an early morning action carried out yesterday at the site of the Kinder Morgan/TGP Connecticut Expansion Pipeline Project, 21 members of the Sugar Shack Alliance successfully blocked construction traffic for almost 3 hours in 2 directions on Cold Spring Road in Sandisfield MA, hindering access to work zones for employees, and, for a short time, disrupting ongoing pipeline construction. The day’s action—undertaken by Sugar Shack Alliance members in the interest of public safety—resulted in the arrest of 10 activists. FROM SUGAR SHACK ALLIANCE <more>

West Virginia Urban Forest Provides Over $59 Million In Ecosystem Services

Morgantown, WV (August 9, 2017) – West Virginia University researchers and the West Virginia Division of Forestry have teamed up to better understand and communicate the significant economic and environmental impacts of urban tree canopy cover across the state. Greg Dahle, associate professor of arboriculture and urban forestry in the WVU Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design, completed a report estimating that West Virginia urban forests provide annual ecosystem services of $59,749,507 by capturing 4,348,592 pounds of pollutants. The report also revealed that more than 2.8 million tons of carbon are sequestered by the trees that make up these urban forests, resulting in an overall benefit of $53,308,328 in stored carbon. FROM ARBOR DAY FOUNDATION <more>

A trillion-dollar investment company is making climate change a business priority
Vanguard Group, one of the largest investment firms in the world, with more than $4 trillion in global assets, has begun urging companies to disclose risks associated with climate change, signaling a major shift for a company that previously had been loath to support climate-related risk disclosures. According Reuters, however, the move reflects not a changing ideology, but growing recognition about the risks that climate change poses to their business and investments. FROM THINKPROGRESS <more>

Jobs (click here for full job listings)

Conservation Projects Manager | Housatonic Valley Association | Cornwall Bridge, CT

Director of Ecological Restoration | MA Dept. of Fish & Game | Boston, MA

Campaign & Volunteer Organizer | ELM Action Fund | Boston, MA

Community Solar Interns | Co-op Power | Florence, MA

Energy Efficiency Intern | Co-op Power | Florence, MA

Community Solar Program Director | Co-op Power | Florence, MA

Energy Efficiency Program Manager | Co-op Power | Florence, MA

Chief Executive Officer | Co-op Power | Florence, MA

In-Lieu Fee Program Assistant | Dept. of Fish and Game | Boston, MA

Development and Communications Director | Schumacher Center for New Economics | Egremont, MA

2017-18 Position Openings | TerraCorps – Various locations

Various Positions | The Manice Education Center (MEC) | Florida, MA

Volunteer Opportunities | The Trustees | Stockbridge & Cummington, MA


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Letter from Sierra Club Director 
Responding to Charlottesville

This weekend’s events in Charlottesville were horrifying.

Violent racists beat, harassed, and murdered peaceful protesters speaking out to stop hate from gaining another inch in our country. This was a direct assault not only on our values of inclusion as Americans, but also an attack on our democracy and peaceful protest itself.The Sierra Club has a long history of marching for justice, for clean air, water, and the climate. We can’t continue that legacy while violent radicals attack any of us.

Some of these same white supremacists work in the Trump Administration. Call the White House now at 1-202-730-9006 and demand they be fired.

Some have asked why Sierra Club would get involved in this issue. To quote Martin Luther King, Jr, “All life is interrelated. We are all caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied into a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one destiny, affects all indirectly.”[1] An attack on racial justice is an attack on all of us, as we are all connected in our rights and dignity as human beings sharing this fragile planet. Or, to echo our founder John Muir, “When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.”[2]

What happens in one part of our ecosystem affects all parts of our ecosystem. And to clean up our ecosystem, we have to eliminate the sources of toxic pollution.

Call the White House now at 1-202-730-9006 and demand the Trump administration fire staffers who support hate.

Senior Strategist Steve Bannon said he wanted his website Breitbart.com to be “the home for the alt-right.”[3] Days before the Charlottesville violence, Adviser Sebastian Gorka said that white nationalists were “not a problem.”[4] And just last week Senior Policy Adviser Stephen Miller tried to argue the Statue of Liberty didn’t welcome immigrants to our country.[5] These are only three recent examples. There are numerous others.

It is more important than ever that we call out these people for exactly what they are: unacceptable racists preaching division and hatred that stand in opposition to the values of equality and justice that must drive our nation forward. Hatred and racism have long played a disgraceful part in American history, but there can be no doubt that those who spew hate feel empowered right now when they see allies in the corridors of power. 

It’s time to clean house. Trump may say he’s condemning white supremacists, yet some of these same people advise him on a daily basis. 

Call the White House now at 1-202-730-9006 and demand that all members of the Administration with ties to the alt-right, white nationalists, or other hate groups be fired. 

When you call, you can use your own words or feel free to use the following script:

“Hello, my name is  Jane and I’m calling from Pittsfield, MA. 

This weekend’s violence in Charlottesville shows that we must take action against hate groups in America. I’m demanding the White House fire anyone in the Trump Administration who supports the alt-right, white nationalism, or other racist groups, specifically Steve Bannon, Stephen Miller, Sebastian Gorka. There is no place for hate in America, and there certainly shouldn’t be in the White House. Thank you.”

Take thirty seconds and call the White House now at 1-202-730-9006. Pressure is starting to mount to fire people like Steve Bannon, and your calls will make a difference. The White House comment line is currently jammed with calls on this, so if you get a busy signal, try again later.

These bigots must be condemned, not coddled, and we are in solidarity with those elected officials, residents of Charlottesville, and people all over this country who are speaking out for an America that pushes forward toward justice, not slides backward into hatred and fear.

Thanks for everything you do,

Michael Brune
Executive Director
Sierra Club

P.S.  Another thing you can do is have a conversation with someone close to you about race and hate. For tips on how to talk to your friends, family, and neighbors, you can start here. 

References

[1] Martin Luther King, Jr., “Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution,” June 2, 1959
[2] Sierra Club, John Muir misquotes.
[3] 
Politico, “Fear rises that Bannon could bring the ‘alt-right’ into White House” 
[4] 
The Guardian, “Q&A: What are Trump and the White House’s links to the far right?” 

[5] The Guardian, “Q&A: What are Trump and the White House’s links to the far right?” 


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The perks of planting trees
(And the challenge of finding places for them)

PITTSFIELD — More trees in Pittsfield will bring down energy costs, but the program tasked with planting them is having trouble taking root.

A statewide program to increase tree cover in urban neighborhoods — which decreases both wind speed and peak high temperatures — is currently underway in the city. The neighborhoods targeted for planting in the Gateway Cities program lack tree cover and are largely low-income, and residents of those areas can benefit the most from reduced energy costs, said Kurt Gaertner, director of land policy at the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs.

The state Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs aims to have 2,400 trees planted in the city of Pittsfield over a three-year period — by the spring of 2019.

But as many trees as there are to plant, the Berkshire Environmental Action Team is having a difficult time finding homeowners who could use them.

There’s a high number of renters in target neighborhoods — they don’t have direct authority to allow the state to plant, said Jane Winn, executive director of the Berkshire Environmental Action Team.

Volunteers needed

The program is also suffering from a lack of outreach volunteers.

“It’s hard to sustain volunteers going door-to-door in 80-degree weather,” she said.

When the state previously directed the group to enlist volunteers to help water already-planted trees at housing complexes like Columbia Arms, Wahconah Heights and Providence Court, the group had many volunteers.

About 60 people had volunteered per month to help water the trees, but the group hasn’t had more than 11 outreach volunteers per month.

“And most of those were just coming once or twice,” Winn said.

The Berkshire Environmental Action Team is implementing the state’s program on the ground, providing outreach to local homeowners about the benefits of having trees on their properties — which the state would pay to plant.

The Greening the Gateway Cities program plants trees in low tree-cover neighborhoods of Gateway Cities — midsize urban centers that anchor regional economies.

Planting numbers vary by season — the fall of 2016 was unique due to the drought, said Peter Lorenz, director of communications and public affairs at the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs.

The group has also encountered challenges with the planting area defined by the state.

“Our boundaries are set, and we cannot go outside our boundaries, even though there are people right outside our boundaries that would like trees,” Winn said.

The group plans to meet with the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs to request a change in the boundaries of the outreach area, she said.

“I don’t feel like the lines of communication on this have been the best,” she said. “I’ve never felt like everything was nice and clearly defined, except we’re trying to get 2,400 trees in the ground, and watered enough so they clearly take.”

The initial planting season in Pittsfield was the spring of 2016. Planting takes place in the spring and fall, which avoids planting during the hottest part of the year, Winn said.

Probably about 75 to 80 percent of the people the group reached have expressed interest, but many people don’t have room on their properties for more trees, Winn said.

The area targeted for planting by the state is concentrated in the West Side and Morningside neighborhoods.

Volunteers have been to almost every home in the target area, along with some businesses, Winn said.

Benefits from trees

But even small cost benefits of the program won’t emerge for at least 10 years.

“This is definitely a long-term investment,” Gaertner said. But the benefits will be substantial, he said.

Gaertner pointed out how reduced tree cover affected the city of Worcester, which experienced an infestation in 2008 of the invasive asian longhorned beetle. The asian longhorned beetle attacks hardwood trees.

The infestation led to the removal of thousands of trees, which resulted in a significant rise in energy use.

Besides potential cost benefits, trees in urban areas have been shown to reduce air pollution, contribute to increased property values and reduce the amount of storm water runoff into city streets, according to an evaluation of the pilot Greening the Gateway Cities program released by Worcester Polytechnic Institute last October.

The largest source of funding for the program comes through the state Department of Energy Resources. Smaller sums come from the state capital and operating budget.

Greening the Gateway Cities was initiated in 2014 by former Gov. Deval Patrick. The program initially encompassed Chelsea, Fall River and Holyoke.

Pittsfield was added in 2016, along with Brockton, Haverhill, Lawrence, Lynn, Leominster, New Bedford and Quincy.

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10 Arrested Wednesday Forming Human Barricade to Block Pipeline Workers and Construction Vehicles in Consideration of Public Safety

FROM SUGAR SHACK ALLIANCE

In an early morning action carried out yesterday at the site of the Kinder Morgan/TGP Connecticut Expansion Pipeline Project, 21 members of the Sugar Shack Alliance successfully blocked construction traffic for almost 3 hours in 2 directions on Cold Spring Road in Sandisfield MA, hindering access to work zones for employees, and, for a short time, disrupting ongoing pipeline construction.  The day’s action—undertaken by Sugar Shack Alliance members in the interest of public safety—resulted in the arrest of 10 activists.

One major safety concern for the Sugar Shack Alliance and their allies is the apparent lack of an evacuation plan in the event of a potentially catastrophic accident.  In 1981, as many Sandisfield residents may recall, during construction of a second of two pipelines, workers accidentally ruptured an existing “live” pipeline, resulting in a serious threat of a gas leak and requiring the evacuation of many townspeople.  With the construction of this new pipeline, Kinder Morgan was also blasting in close proximity to two existing “live” gas pipelines.  This cavalier attitude on the part of Kinder Morgan—and their discernible lack of concern over unforeseen consequences suffered by local residents, pipeline workers, as well as the general public in the event of a potentially deadly accident—greatly encouraged this action.

In addition, we are alarmed that once construction is complete, Kinder Morgan will be removing over half a million gallons of water from Lower Spectacle Pond to test their pipes.  There is currently no available information as to what toxins may be contained in those pipes during construction.  The water, warmed during the test process, along with any number of unknown residues, will be discharged down a steep slope of the easement into Spectacle Pond Brook then travel into the Clam River, a designated coldwater fishery.  To make matters worse, we believe this land is still be protected under Article 97 of the Massachusetts State Constitution, which states that the land be conserved in perpetuity, guaranteed for the use and enjoyment by the people of Massachusetts, and not used for private profit.

The Sugar Shack Alliance remains deeply rooted in the principles of non-violent civil disobedience.  We work in unison with the larger environmental and climate justice movement, and all peoples of the world who seek to disrupt any and all expansion of the fossil fuel industry.

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West Virginia Urban Forest Provides Over
$59 Million In Ecosystem Services

Source: “WVU completes study estimating urban forests provide more than $59 million in ecosystem services,” News Release

Morgantown, WV (August 9, 2017) – West Virginia University researchers and the West Virginia Division of Forestry have teamed up to better understand and communicate the significant economic and environmental impacts of urban tree canopy cover across the state.

Greg Dahle, associate professor of arboriculture and urban forestry in the WVU Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design, completed a report estimating that West Virginia urban forests provide annual ecosystem services of $59,749,507 by capturing 4,348,592 pounds of pollutants.

The report also revealed that more than 2.8 million tons of carbon are sequestered by the trees that make up these urban forests, resulting in an overall benefit of $53,308,328 in stored carbon.

Dahle’s comprehensive study – one that started out as a 2015 summer project for a former undergraduate student and was completed earlier this summer – focused on West Virginia’s 16 cities and towns that had earned the Tree City USA designation. TCUSA communities are part of a national program that provides the framework for community forestry management in the United States.

The value of the report will be far-reaching, extending from West Virginia to eastern Brazil.

“The report began as a project for Angela Sakazaki, who was at WVU as part of her study abroad program from Brazil,” Dahle said. “Angela wanted to learn how to utilize i-Tree Canopy, a state-of-the-art software suite from the USDA Forest Service, so that when she returned to her home University she could introduce this tool.”

Dahle then reached out to Bob Hannah, urban forestry coordinator with the West Virginia Division of Forestry, to see if there were any needs they could meet.

“Bob advised that the state would be interested in an i-Tree Canopy baseline assessment of the Tree City USA program in West Virginia,” Dahle said. Such an assessment had never been done before.

“This information should prove to be a valuable tool to promote the Tree City USA program, as well as urban tree care in West Virginia,” Hannah said. “We plan to condense this information into a brochure for municipalities to utilize.”

Hannah also views this new data as being a means to a much bigger end, saying the data will be valuable to helping the Division of Forestry meet its two-part goal.

“First, this will be valuable information for existing Tree City USA communities to share with their respective city officials and councils so that tree care efforts and investments in the program will continue,” he explained. “Second, we hope this will encourage additional cities to become interested in the benefits of trees and begin taking steps toward becoming Tree City USA communities.”

For Sakazaki, the experience served as both a concluding and launching point in her academic career. She finished her project, returned to the Federal University of Viçosa and completed her program, earning a bachelor’s in forest engineering in 2016.

“When I finished the presentation of this project, my teacher told me that it is absolutely possible to use my findings as the foundation for a graduate-level project,” Sakazaki said.

Though she doesn’t plan to do that as an immediate next step, Sakazaki says it is a possibility for the future and, in the meantime, the project has been beneficial to many of her colleagues working on sustainability-related projects.

This study underscores the value of seeing the forest and the trees, regardless of the location on the map – but especially important for the Mountain State.

“In this heavily forested state, many residents take their urban trees for granted,” Dahle said. “This report helps our forest managers better understand and communicate the crucial role urban forestry fulfills in our cities and communities. I hope this will help drive interest in not only planting more street trees, but in maintaining green spaces along homes and businesses throughout the state.”

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A trillion-dollar investment company is making climate change a business priority

Vanguard Group is urging companies to disclose risks to their business associated with climate change.

Vanguard Group, one of the largest investment firms in the world, with more than $4 trillion in global assets, has begun urging companies to disclose risks associated with climate change, signaling a major shift for a company that previously had been loath to support climate-related risk disclosures. According Reuters, however, the move reflects not a changing ideology, but growing recognition about the risks that climate change poses to their business and investments.

Among other businesses, Vanguard pushed for ExxonMobil, the world’s largest oil and gas company, to disclose how its future business models could be impacted by the global effort to keep temperatures below 2ºC (3.6ºF). In May of this year, 62 percent of Exxon’s stakeholders voted in favor of a resolution requiring the company to disclose climate-associated business risks.

Vanguard’s newfound interest in climate disclosures represents a radical shift in perspective for the investment firm — as recently as 2015, the company had yet to support a single sustainability resolution proposed by various stakeholders.

“Our support for these proposals is not a matter of ideology, it’s a matter of economics,” Glenn Booraem, Vanguard’s investment stewardship officer, told Reuters. “To the extent there are significant risks to a company’s long-term value proposition, we want to make sure there is long-term disclosure of those risks to the market.”

While Vanguard’s investment stewardship officer cautioned Reuters that the shift in perspective could seem small at first — warning that this year’s overall voting for the spring proxy season might not change as rapidly as some would expect — it does highlight a small but growing number of major companies that are sounding the alarm about risks to investments and assets brought by climate change.

“It tells corporate boards and management that their largest investors regard this as a significant issue and companies are going to have to improve their strategy and their disclosures on climate-related risks, and also opportunities,” Ceres’ Davis said. “I think it’s a sign that climate change has become mainstream as an investment issue.”

Earlier this spring, Chevron became the first major, publicly-owned fossil fuel company to disclose the risks associated with climate change — specifically, the financial risks that could come with an increase in litigation against the company. And those fears appear to be well-founded: In July, two California counties and one California city sued 37 major fossil fuel companies, including Chevron, for damages associated with climate-fueled sea level rise.

Australia’s biggest bank, the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, is also currentlyfacing a first-of-its-kind climate change lawsuit for allegedly failing to disclose the risks climate change could pose to financial stability. Two investors in the bank, Guy and Kim Abrahams, argue that the company’s 2016 annual report “failed to give a true and fair view of its financial position and performance,” like disclosing that sea level rise could impact prices in the housing market or that global treaties like the Paris agreement might strand fossil fuel assets.

“For banks as well as all companies, this is an area that is moving very quickly,” Emma Herd, chief executive of the Investor Group on Climate Change in Australia,told the Guardian. “And certainly from the investor perspective the bar keeps getting raised in terms of what is considered adequate disclosure in terms of climate-related financial risk.”

Numerous economic studies have tried to estimate the cost associated with climate change, from lost productivity fueled by temperatures that make working outside impossible or increased destruction from more extreme weather events.One 2015 study found that if climate change were allowed to continue unmitigated, global incomes would fall 23 percent by 2100, with 77 percent of countries experiencing a drop in per capita incomes relative to current levels. Another analysis, conducted in 2015 by Cambridge University’s Judge business school, found that even a moderate warming scenario could cost the world $400 trillion.


Jobs

 


Conservation Projects Manager
Housatonic Valley Association | Cornwall Bridge, CT

The Housatonic Valley Association (HVA) is seeking a highly motivated, detail-oriented environmental professional to join our Watershed Conservation Team. The successful candidate will support all aspects of HVA’s conservation projects, which include (but aren’t limited to) environmental monitoring, regional road-stream crossing assessment and replacement planning, watershed management planning, stream corridor restoration, stormwater management through Green Infrastructure development, and environmental education. This position is based out of HVA’s Connecticut office.

This is only a part of the job description. To view the full descriptions and to apply, click here.


Director of Ecological Restoration
MA Department of Fish & Game | Boston, MA

The Division of Ecological Restoration is charged with restoring and protecting the health and integrity of the Commonwealth’s rivers, wetlands, and watersheds for the benefit of people and the environment. This mission is critical to the success of the Department of Fish and Game that manages, protects, and restores the natural resources of the Commonwealth.

The Division of Ecological Restoration works with community-based partners to restore aquatic ecosystems. The Division’s ecological restoration work brings clean water, recreation opportunities, and other ecosystem services to the citizens of Massachusetts.

The Director leads the Division of Ecological Restoration, one of three Divisions (and one Office) of the Department of Fish and Game. The Director is responsible for all functions and program performance ensuring that the Deputy Director is properly managing the day-today operations of the Division and the assistant director is administering annual budgets properly. The Director develops and makes sure the annual and five-year strategic plan goals are implemented and sets procedures and program priorities for the Deputy Director and Assistant Director to faithfully administer. The Director oversees development of the operational and capital budgets and manages a diverse staff.

This is only a small part of the job description. Click here to read the full description and to apply. 


Campaign & Volunteer Organizer
ELM Action Fund
 | Boston, MA

We are seeking a Campaign and Volunteer Organizer to help us continue to build grassroots power to protect our state’s environment through advocacy and elections.

Main responsibilities:

  • Play a key role in helping to elect environmental champions to state and local office
  • Train and mobilize environmental activists to participate in our campaign activities and advocacy work
  • Assist with the ELM Action Fund’s endorsement process for state and local candidates
  • Manage ELM Action Fund’s database entry and organization in VAN and Salesforce
  • Assist with campaign event planning and implementation
  • Handle correspondence with candidates, staff, and campaign volunteers
  • Support ELM Action Fund’s advocacy and legislative work

Qualifications:

  • Three to five years experience working as a community/issue organizer or other related experience
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
  • Strong social media and online engagement skills
  • Excellent organizational skills and high attention to detail
  • Proven ability to manage multiple projects simultaneously
  • Ability to travel throughout Massachusetts
  • Flexibility to work nights and weekends
  • Commitment to environmental advocacy

Preferred:

  • Multi-lingual (ideally, Spanish) or other languages a plus
  • Experience working in low-income communities and communities of color
  • Experience working on, volunteering for or running a political campaign
  • Experience with VAN/Votebuilder

Duration: This is a full time position based in downtown Boston.
Salary and benefits: Salary is commensurate with experience. This position includes health insurance and paid time off.
How to apply: Interested candidates should submit a cover letter and resume to [email protected]. Deadline for applications is August 23, 2017. Learn more about the ELM Action Fund at www.elmaction.org.

ELM is an equal-opportunity employer and we strongly encourage applications from all interested candidates. We do not discriminate on the basis of race, ancestry, creed, religion, personal appearance, national origin, citizenship, age, gender, or sexual orientation.


Various Positions at Co-op Power

Co-op Power in Florence, MA, is hiring for:

  • Chief Executive Officer
  • Energy Efficiency Program Manager
  • Community Solar Program Director
  • Energy Efficiency Intern
  • Community Solar Interns

Full details and how to apply here.

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Development and Communications Director
Schumacher Center for New Economics | Egremont, MA

The Schumacher Center is looking for an exceptional individual to join our team and work with other program staff and the executive director to represent the organization and further its goals. A successful candidate will be a detail-oriented team player with proven writing, speaking, and event coordination skills, and a demonstrated interest in shaping a more just and sustainable economic system. The ideal candidate will have the ability to learn quickly and anticipate the needs of a fast-moving team, while also possessing creativity and a positive attitude. Full details and how to apply here.

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2017-18 Position Openings with TerraCorps – Various locations

TerraCorps, formerly MassLIFT-AmeriCorps, is an innovative national service program helping communities conserve and secure land for the health and well-being of people and nature. This year we are looking for 36 members to serve in full-time, 11 month positions. Members will carry out capacity building projects; educate or train individuals; recruit, train, manage, and support community volunteers engaged in land-based activities; and identify new individuals and groups to participate in education, recreation, or service opportunities centered around land access and conservation.

Members serve as: Land Stewardship Coordinators, Regional Conservation Coordinators, Youth Education Coordinators, or Community Engagement Coordinators.

These 1,700 hour AmeriCorps positions receive a living allowance, education award, and additional AmeriCorps benefits. The 2017-2018 program will run from 8/28/17 – 7/27/18.

Application specifics, position descriptions, and information about organizations hosting TerraCorps members can be found at here.

Applications will be accepted until all positions are filled.

AmeriCorps programs provide equal service opportunities. TerraCorps will recruit and select persons in all positions to ensure a diverse and inclusive climate without regard to any particular status. We encourage applications from individuals with disabilities and will provide reasonable accommodations for interviews and service upon request. TerraCorps is a grant program of the Corporation for National and Community Service.

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 Various Positions
The Manice Education Center (MEC) | Florida, MA

The Manice Education Center (MEC) is intentionally located in a unique outdoor setting within the heart of the Berkshire Mountains of Western Massachusetts. MEC operates several distinctly different seasonal programs that are experientially focused in high-quality environmental education, wilderness camping, and leadership training.

Summer Outdoor educators will lead wilderness expeditions for campers & can expect to guide an average of 6 backpacking and/or canoeing trips, ranging from 2 to 5 days in length.  Expedition locations inlude the Appalachian Trail, Long Trail, Savoy Mountain State Forest, Taconic Trail, Battenkill River, Deerfield River, & Connecticut River. Educators receive training in backpacking and wilderness navigation, participate in a 2 day professional canoe clinic, & can earn free certifications in Wildernes First Aid and/or Waterfront Lifeguarding.

APPLY TODAY – SEND US A COVER LETTER AND RESUME TO [email protected]

For more details please visit our Jobs page (click here).

Please share this opportunity with your friends and colleagues! If you have any questions about employment in Christodora programs, please contact Matthew Scholl, Programs Director at 413.663.8463 or email us at [email protected]

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In-Lieu Fee Program Administrator

MassCareers Job Number 170003IV

The Department of Fish and Game (DFG) is accepting applications for their new In-Lieu Fee (ILF) Program Administrator position. The ILF Program Administrator will be responsible for developing a comprehensive framework for ILF Program planning and implementation including: identification, prioritization, selection, review, and approval of proposed mitigation projects; monitoring and tracking implementation, performance, and completion of approved mitigation projects; and managing all financial, accounting, budgeting, and reporting activities and requirements related to DFG’s administration of the ILF Program consistent with Department policies and the ILF Program Instrument. The ILF Program Administrator is a position within the Office of the Commissioner but will also work collaboratively and in partnership with staff from the Division of Ecological Restoration, Division of Marine Fisheries, Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, and the agency’s Land Protection Program.

For additional information and details about the ILF Program Administrator position, and to apply, please visit the MassCareers Job Opportunities website and search for Job Number 170003IV or click here. The job is open until filled. However, applicants within the first two weeks typically receive preference. For additional information about DFG’s In-Lieu Fee Program click here.

Questions? Please contact Christy Edwards at [email protected] or 617-626-1518.

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 Volunteer Opportunities with The Trustees

“Time travel” with The Trustees, and take our visitors on the voyage with you! Become a National Historic Landmark Greeter at Mission House (Stockbridge) or Tour Guide at the William Cullen Bryant Homestead (Cummington) and share the stories and magic of these special places. No experience necessary. Training provided. Fridays through Sundays. Flexible. Fun. Social. Rewarding.

Visit www.thetrustees.org/volunteer or contact [email protected] or413.532.1631 ext. 3119 for more information.

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