The BEAT News

Indigenous Water Protectors and Environmentalists Call on TD Bank to
Divest From Fossil Fuels

After months of protests on the front lines of pipeline construction in Otis State Forest, local community members and indigenous activists from around the country are turning their attention to the funders of the fossil fuel industry. TD Bank, with branches throughout western Massachusetts, is a major funder of companies such as Kinder Morgan that build pipelines carrying fracked gas from tar sands in the U.S and Canada. On Monday, October 23 concerned citizens will be gathering at the Southern Berkshire District Court In Great Barrington at 9 am where four Water Protectors from Standing Rock will have a pre-trial hearing for their non-violent prayerful actions to stop the pipeline in Otis. Since construction of the $93 million Kinder Morgan pipeline project began in Sandisfield and Otis State Forest in April, over seventy citizens have been arrested while trying to stop the pipeline construction. FROM SUGAR SHACK ALLIANCE  <more> 

USDA Farmers Market Promotion Grant Awarded to Berkshire Regional Planning Commission

The Berkshire Regional Planning Commission, in partnership with Berkshire Farm & Table and Alchemy Initiative, has been awarded a three-year capacity-building U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) Farmers Market Promotion Program (FMPP) grant in the amount of $238,595 for the Berkshire Market Collective project.“As a native of the Southern Berkshires and as Chairman of the Massachusetts Legislative Joint Committee on Environment, Natural Resources and Agriculture, I am excited to see the USDA supporting the Berkshire Market Collective through their 2017 Farmers Market Promotion Program grant…” said said State Representative Smitty Pignatelli. FROM BERKSHIRE FARM & TABLE <more> 

State Officials Announce Transportation Sector Emissions Listening Sessions

The Baker-Polito Administration today announced dates for a series of listening sessions across the Commonwealth to discuss solutions to the challenge of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. The public forums, to be hosted by the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT), were first announced by Governor Charlie Baker at a Municipal Climate Change Summit held in September to mark the one-year anniversary of Executive Order 569, “Establishing an Integrated Climate Change Strategy for the Commonwealth.” FROM MA EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS <more> 

A Pipeline Runs Through It
New Article by Winona LaDuke

[BEAT note: Winona LaDuke will be one of the featured speakers at the upcoming Schumacher Lectures in Great Barrington on November 4th. Tickets are still available here.]
While the national press has kept a focus on the controversy over the Keystone XL pipeline, something is going in northern Minnesota. This has to do with the Enbridge Company, a Canadian Company who is determined to move oil from places where there is no infrastructure, and is showing its determination in some ways which Northerners may not like. That oil is destined for Superior. Lots of it headed this way. This is far more than a single Keystone pipeline, like four times as much oil. FROM HONOR THE EARTH <more> 

New Report: Health Effects Associated with Chemical Emissions from NYS Natural Gas Compressor Stations: 2008-2014

October 12 – Today, EHP releases its groundbreaking report on the chemical and particulate emissions of the 18 largest compressor stations in New York State (NYS). It outlines in specific detail what companies are required to report to the NY Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and National Emissions Inventory (NEI) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the potential health effects of the 70 chemicals catalogued. This is the first time emissions data and their health effects have been compiled side-by-side raising questions about how residents’ health is impacted in communities close to the facilities. FROM SOUTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH PROJECT <more> 

Jobs (click here for full job listings)

MA Community Organizer  | Mothers Out Front | Worcester, MA

Government Relations Specialist | The Nature Conservancy | Boston, MA

Event Planner | Wild & Scenic Westfield River Committee | Westfield, MA 

Campus Organizer | PIRG Campus Action | Western MA

Environmental Health Manager | Pioneer Valley Asthma Coalition | Springfield, MA

Regional Recycling Coordinator | City of Pittsfield | Pittsfield, MA 

Conservation Projects Manager | Housatonic Valley Association | Cornwall Bridge, CT

Director of Ecological Restoration | MA Dept. of Fish & Game | Boston, MA

Community Solar Interns | Co-op Power | Florence, MA

Energy Efficiency Intern | Co-op Power | Florence, MA

Community Solar Program Director | Co-op Power | Florence, MA

Energy Efficiency Program Manager | Co-op Power | Florence, MA

Chief Executive Officer | Co-op Power | Florence, MA

2017-18 Position Openings | TerraCorps – Various locations

Various Positions | The Manice Education Center (MEC) | Florida, MA

VOLUNTEER Haunted House Tour Guides | Naumkeag | Stockbridge, MA

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Indigenous Water Protectors and Environmentalists Call on TD Bank to Divest From Fossil Fuels

FROM SUGAR SHACK ALLIANCE
[BEAT Note: We are concerned about protestors claiming the police or the pipeline workers are bad people. We are fighting corporate greed, not the workers who are building the pipeline, and not the police who are protecting both the workers and the protestors. Yes, individual police can be bad, but implying that all our police are bad for doing this work is not the right thing to do.]

After months of protests on the front lines of pipeline construction in Otis State Forest, local community members and indigenous activists from around the country are turning their attention to the funders of the fossil fuel industry. TD Bank, with branches throughout western Massachusetts, is a major funder of companies such as Kinder Morgan that build pipelines carrying fracked gas from tar sands in the U.S and Canada.

On Monday, October 23 concerned citizens will be gathering at the Southern Berkshire District Court In Great Barrington at 9 am where four Water Protectors from Standing Rock will have a pre-trial hearing for their non-violent prayerful actions to stop the pipeline in Otis. Since construction of the $93 million Kinder Morgan pipeline project began in Sandisfield and Otis State Forest in April, over seventy citizens have been arrested while trying to stop the pipeline construction. Unlike charges against previous activists at the Otis pipeline, their charges have not been de-criminalized. “Water Protectors and Massachusetts residents, have taken it upon ourselves to uphold Massachusetts State Constitution Article 97, while our own state police protect corporate greed,” says Micah Big Wind Lott, from the Northern Arapaho Nation, one of those facing criminal charges.

After a press conference on the courthouse steps, the Water Protectors, activists from the Sugar Shack Alliance and local allies will walk to the center of Great Barrington. There, clergy and indigenous leaders will hold a prayer service in front of TD Bank. A Call for Divestment will be read and distributed, stating in part, “As consumers and customers of all sizes, we demand TD Bank stop using our money to fund tar sands pipelines that our communities and planet cannot afford. We call on our neighbors, elected officials, and pension managers to close all accounts with TD Bank unless they immediately stop financing tar sands pipelines.”

The divestment action is part of three days of global divestment actions (https://mazaskatalks.org, #DivestTheGlobe). “We are walking from the courthouse to the bank to point out that the human and environmental violations of fossil fuel pipelines, in Otis State Forest and around the country, are only possible with the funding of large financial institutions like TD Bank,” said Steven Botkin, a member of the Sugar Shack Alliance. “We are asking individuals, towns and institutions to close their accounts at TD Bank and move their money to local banks and credit unions.”

This action will also launch a week of resistance (October 23rd – October 29th) throughout Western Massachusetts in opposition to Kinder Morgan and their unnecessary pipeline that is destroying Indigenous stonescapes, damaging fragile wetlands and endangered species, and threatening the climate of our planet. All people are invited to these events.


USDA Farmers Market Promotion Grant Awarded to Berkshire Regional Planning Commission
Berkshire Farm & Table and Alchemy Initiative Partner to Form the Berkshire Market Collective

The Berkshire Regional Planning Commission, in partnership with Berkshire Farm & Table and Alchemy Initiative, has been awarded a three-year capacity-building U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) Farmers Market Promotion Program (FMPP) grant in the amount of $238,595 for the Berkshire Market Collective project.
“As a native of the Southern Berkshires and as Chairman of the Massachusetts Legislative Joint Committee on Environment, Natural Resources and Agriculture, I am excited to see the USDA supporting the Berkshire Market Collective through their 2017 Farmers Market Promotion Program grant. The Berkshire Market Collective is a fantastic way to connect the farming industry to the statewide demand for accessible, healthy foods,” said said State Representative Smitty Pignatelli. The work done by the Berkshire Regional Planning Commission, Berkshire Farm & Table and Alchemy Initiative through the Collective to create opportunities for farmers to thrive and succeed here in the Berkshires is impressive, to say the least. I thank all of those who work tirelessly to improve access to locally produced goods and to get fresh, healthy food on dinner tables throughout Berkshire County and Massachusetts.”
The Berkshire Regional Planning Commission, Berkshire Farm & Table and Alchemy Initiative will together create the Berkshire Market Collective to address the growing needs of 20 independent markets currently operating in the Berkshires. The project will build capacity, address market challenges, provide an ongoing support network to farmers market managers, increase customer volume and sales, and ultimately contribute to economic development in the region.
“The Berkshire Regional Planning Commission (BRPC) is thrilled to have received this award from the USDA Farmers Market Promotion Program. We were instrumental in the ‘Keep Berkshires Farming’ movement and were happy to partner on this project when approached by Berkshire Farm & Table and Alchemy Initiative in early 2017,” said Nathaniel Karns, executive director of BRPC. “The Sustainable Berkshires Plan, developed in 2014, indicates that the resident demand for fresh vegetables is more than twice the current supply and the demand for fresh fruits and berries is roughly four times the current supply. Despite a more than adequate customer base, local farmers continue to struggle to make ends meet during a relatively short growing season. BRPC hopes to address this by serving as a neutral facilitator of the Berkshire Market Collective and building capacity of the 20 independent farmers markets in the region.”
The USDA AMS was able to fund 11 percent of the applications received this year and the Berkshire Market Collective was one of two applications selected to support projects in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The grant received high overall scores in many areas including alignment and intent, achievability, expertise and partners, and technical merit. This is the first full capacity-building grant the Berkshire region has been awarded for the AMS FMPP by the USDA.
“Congratulations to the Berkshire Regional Planning Commission in conjunction with Berkshire Farm & Table and Alchemy Initiative for receiving this grant from the USDA,” said Congressman Richard E. Neal. “The Berkshires have many positive attributes —  among them is its dedication to local farms and businesses. This grant will be a major resource for producers and consumers alike in continuing to promote the array of goods produced in this region.”
Berkshire Farm & Table and Alchemy Initiative approached BRPC to join forces in early 2017 after first applying for the USDA grant in 2016 to support the Berkshire Market Collective project. Grant-writing expertise of BRPC helped strengthen this year’s proposal and as lead applicant and proj
ect manager, BRPC will serve as a neutral facilitator in bringing together independent farmers markets throughout the region. The Berkshire Market Collective will build upon the work of past and current market managers and stakeholders in the region working to support farmers markets.
“We are absolutely thrilled to receive funding for our application this year and to be working with the Berkshire Regional Planning Commission and Berkshire Farm & Table,” said Jessica Vecchia, executive director of Alchemy Initiative. “Farmers markets face universal challenges and could truly benefit from stronger connections and sharing of resources. Our markets are interspersed from North Adams to Pittsfield to Sheffield and BRPC’s past community and economic development work with all towns and cities in the Berkshires will play a key role in the success of this three-year collaborative project.”
The Berkshire Market Collective will meet several objectives: First, it will create a resource for market managers to share information, knowledge and expertise. The Collective will meet with market managers to assess the needs and challenges of each individual market. A discussion forum and toolkit will be created to share information, streamline market operations, provide training and reduce the administrative burden of managing a farmers market.
“We are just a five-year standing market but are always being asked for support from other markets — sharing resources from rules and regs to vendor contacts and training other market managers in SNAP — and we’re excited to have a stronger system in place to help make that a reality,” added Vecchia who is also the founding market manager for the Downtown Pittsfield Farmers Market.
Second, the Collective will determine a baseline of sales in dollars and initial customer counts to document the volume of sales increases and percentage changes in customer count over the course of the three-year project. Lastly, the Collective will develop a unified marketing strategy to create opportunities rather than barriers and promote each of the independent markets though a universal campaign that is contemporary, customer-friendly and cost-effective.
“We are very excited to have been awarded this grant and to have the opportunity to work in partnership with Alchemy Initiative and the Berkshire Regional Planning Commission,” said Angela Cardinali, executive director of Berkshire Farm & Table. “The Collective is a robust initiative to help farmers and food makers build business and to enable us to continue to tell more of the food story of the Berkshires. We plan to celebrate our 20 markets as a regional trademark while shining a spotlight on each individual market and provide marketing strategy, resources and support to continue to grow our local food economy.”
The Berkshire Market Collective’s work will begin with outreach to market managers, development of a strategic plan and three-year timeline, and a search for marketing design and data collection vendors. The Collective will create a support network of local, regional and national organizations and other stakeholders to collaborate in making the project a success. Information-gathering sessions will take place before the end of the year to begin the development of a resource-sharing network. For additional information, contact Melissa Provencher, BRPC project manager, at 413.442.1521 x22.

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State Officials Announce Transportation Sector Emissions Listening Sessions

FROM MA EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS

Boston — The Baker-Polito Administration today announced dates for a series of listening sessions across the Commonwealth to discuss solutions to the challenge of reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. The public forums, to be hosted by the Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs (EEA) and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT), were first announced by Governor Charlie Baker at a Municipal Climate Change Summit held in September to mark the one-year anniversary of Executive Order 569, “Establishing an Integrated Climate Change Strategy for the Commonwealth.”

“Massachusetts leads the nation in combatting and preparing for the impacts of climate change and our Administration has worked in a bipartisan fashion to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to ensure we meet our commitments under the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2008,” said Governor Charlie Baker. “While Massachusetts has made significant strides to combat climate change, we must continue to work together across the Commonwealth and the region to achieve substantial emission reductions from every sector, including transportation, in order to chart a course that will ensure we can meet emission limits for 2050.”

“As Massachusetts works to address emission reductions and improve our transportation infrastructure we look forward to hearing innovative ideas from stakeholders,” said Lieutenant Governor Karyn Polito. “We’re pleased to be able to hold these sessions across Massachusetts so communities and residents have an opportunity to help us tackle this next challenge as we continue to develop new solutions to combat the causes of climate change and work to build a more climate-resilient Commonwealth.”

As of 2014, the latest year with complete data, the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection’s greenhouse gas inventory shows the Commonwealth on track to meet emission reduction limits of 25 percent below 1990 levels for 2020 with current reductions at 21 percent from the 1990 baseline. Progress to date on emissions reductions has been largely driven by reductions in the power sector, with the transportation sector now representing the largest share of statewide emissions. While Massachusetts has a number of policies in the Clean Energy and Climate Plan for 2020 that reduce transportation emissions, further reduction is needed to position the Commonwealth to meet the GWSA emission reduction goal for 2050 of 80 percent reductions.

Executive Order 569, signed last September by Governor Baker, directed the Secretaries of Energy and Environmental Affairs and Transportation to work together on regional policies to reduce emissions from the transportation sector. Expanding on this collaborative approach, the statewide transportation listening sessions will be co-hosted by EEA and MassDOT.

“These listening sessions highlight the collaborative approach the Baker-Polito Administration is taking to work across state government and with our cities and towns to reduce emissions and prepare for the impacts of climate change,” said Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs, Matthew Beaton. “As the state continues to be active in a number of regional efforts including the Transportation Climate Initiative, the New England Governors and Eastern Canadian Premiers, and the Multi-State Zero Emission Vehicles Memorandum of Understanding, these sessions will ensure that we are gathering all of the best ideas on this challenge from across the Commonwealth.”

“MassDOT is working with municipal partners to make a difference in lowering Greenhouse Gas emissions,” said Transportation Secretary and CEO Stephanie Pollack. “From solar panels and new LED lighting along the Commonwealth’s highways and at transit parking facilities, to new LEED certified buildings, improved infrastructure and upgraded rainwater management, MassDOT has been proactive in reducing emissions while strengthening the transportation system that residents and visitors rely on. Working collaboratively with communities, MassDOT is helping to develop new, practical solutions in order to meet commitments made regarding transportation sector emissions.”

The public listening sessions for stakeholders will cover strategies to:

  • Reduce transportation sector emissions through measures addressing vehicles, fuels, and land use;
  • Develop a comprehensive regional strategy for the deployment of zero emission vehicles;
  • Increase the resilience of transportation infrastructure as the climate changes; and
  • Address environmental justice, low income and rural communities.

The sessions will be held on the following dates:

Tuesday, October 31, 2017 | 9:00am
State Transportation Building, 10 Park Plaza, Boston, MA
Register Here   

Thursday, November 2, 2017 | 6:00pm
MassDEP Central Region Office, 8 New Bond Street, Worcester, MA
No Registration Required

Monday, November 6, 2017 | 11:00am
UMass-Amherst, Student Union – Cape Cod Lounge, 280 Hicks Way, Amherst, MA
Register Here 

Thursday, November 9, 2017 | 6:00pm
West Middle School, 271 West Street, Brockton, MA
No Registration Required

Those individuals wishing to submit written comments may do so herefrom October 10, 2017 through January 1, 2018, or email them to [email protected] 

Efforts to reduce transportation sector emissions support implementation of Governor Charlie Baker’s Executive Order 569, An Order Establishing an Integrated Climate Change Strategy for the Commonwealth and emission reduction limits established by the Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA) of 2008. The GWSA requires a GHG emissions reduction of 25 percent below 1990 emissions levels by 2020 and at least an 80 percent reduction by 2050. In early August, pursuant to Executive Order 569, the Department of Environmental Protection promulgated six new regulations to ensure the Commonwealth is on track to meet its 2020 emission reduction limits. The Executive Order also directs the state to begin planning for climate change adaptation and working with cities and towns across the Commonwealth to assess vulnerability and build resiliency to address climate change impacts.

 

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A Pipeline Runs Through It
New Article by Winona LaDuke

[BEAT note: Winona LaDuke will be one of the featured speakers at the upcoming Schumacher Lectures in Great Barrington on November 4th. Tickets are still available here.]
This is land that has been in my family for decades. It is prime Red River valley agriculture land. It was handed down to me by my mother and father when they passed away, and I’m intending to hand it down to my children when I pass away …. My wife and I have …told our children that we will pass this on. Of course if 225,000 barrels of oil bursts through this thing, that certainly is the end of this family legacy. – James Botsford, North Dakota landowner in Enbridge Sandpiper right of way
While the national press has kept a focus on the controversy over the Keystone XL pipeline, something is going in northern Minnesota. This has to do with the Enbridge Company, a Canadian Company who is determined to move oil from places where there is no infrastructure, and is showing its determination in some ways which Northerners may not like. That oil is destined for Superior. Lots of it headed this way. This is far more than a single Keystone pipeline, like four times as much oil.
Here’s a bit on the math and the pipelines. Between Gretna Manitoba and Clearbrook Minnesota, there are eight Enbridge Pipelines already in a l60 mile swath. Then we get down to a few less lines, but those are all being upscaled and expanded. Enbridge (also known as the North Dakota Pipeline Company and several other dba aliases ) is now proposing three pipeline expansions, Line 3, Line 67 ,Line 13 aka the Southern Lights increase(that goes the other way carrying dilutent to the tar sands, but still can leak) , and a new line called the Sandpiper. This would be an increase of over one million barrels of oil today, or, 42 million gallons of oil per day. “ Northern Minnesota is becoming the super highway for oil,” Attorney Paul Blackburn tells me. If all the lines go through, the sum total of oil traveling over northern Minnesota’s lakes and waters could be about four million barrels per day,. This is about 200 times more than the amount of oil spilled in the Kalamazoo Enbridge spill in 2010. Not surprisingly, there are a number of increasingly concerned northerners.
Do some math, and help me out: All of this oil, say four million barrels a day will end up in Superior, and there is a Calumet refinery there with a capacity for 46,000 barrels per day. So, that means more oil moving from Superior- into an expanded yet aging infrastructure in the Great Lakes, new pipelines maybe, and more than that, tankers. Gichi Gummi, as we call it, or Superior is unique in depth and purity. It also doesn’t change the water much, so one spill and well, that’s not a good thing. One fifth of the world’s fresh water. But let’s not dwell on that. But do note that there are l7 refinery expansions proposed for the Great Lakes region, and that is a lot of oil. That is a lot of oil proposed to be moved by a company which has had many safety violations, and holds the records for the worst land oil spill in US history, as well as a number of Minnesota spills, like Cohasset, and a big explosion in Clearbrook. (In a rare move, PHMSA, the Pipeline and Hazardous Safety Materials Administration, issued a system wide corrective action order against Enbridge, because of the number of violations).
It is also not clear where that oil is going , since the US is now one of the largest producers of oil , and it turns out, we’re exporting six times as much finished petroleum products (2.1 million barrels of oil per day) as the “need” for the Sandpiper( as one example) expects to carry…(350,000 bpd).for America’s energy security.
When the Bear and the Seals Escaped
I remember when the polar bear and seals escaped from the Duluth Zoo. Or at least I can picture it in my mind. It was a good one, and a strange one, and it had a lot to do with climate change and infrastructure… two basics in our society. It turns out, I am not opposed to pipelines. In fact, I like infrastructure. It would be nice to rely on it. According to the American Society of Civil Engineers the US has a D in infrastructure. In the latest Infrastructure Report Card the country got a D on drinking and waste water infrastructure and a D+ on energy infrastructure. Duluth itself had a few infrastructure problems we found out when the big deluge hit the city, and the polar bear and seals escaped from the zoo. Climate change shows our weaknesses, and there is more to come.
The reality is that infrastructure failure is causing gas explosions and water main ruptures around the country. Infrastructure failure is when our I 35 Bridge collapses in Minneapolis, and infrastructure failure is when ten thousand gallons of oil spills in down town Los Angeles, 7,000 barrels spills in Mayflower Arkansas, or a train track crumbles under the weight of massive additional cars carrying, well fossil fuels like fracked oil and coal, and it turns out we’ve not invested in rail infrastructure for fifty years or so. We have an infrastructure problem generally in the country. Some folks would say we should fix old pipelines before we make new ones. One example of that might be Enbridge Line 3, which according to the Bemidji Pioneer is 46 years old, and has been “undergoing almost constant maintenance..” Or perhaps that 50 year old Enbridge line under the Great Lakes. If I had a chance, I’d take a look see at that one. There is something called the PIG, or the pipeline inspection gauge, by the way, which Enbridge does use to check the lines… but then they have to repair them. It turns out that the company knew about weaknesses in the Kalamazoo area, but failed to take corrective action, according to the National Transportation Safety Board.
There was a study done on the Keystone XL route, which asked some of these questions, and found some interesting answers. The study found that spending money on unmet water and gas infrastructure needs in the five relevant states along the KXL pipeline route will create more than 300,000 total jobs across all sectors, or five times more jobs than the KXL, with ninety five times more long term jobs. Similar statistics might apply in Minnesota, which has a reported $6 billion in infrastructure needs, about the equivalent of projected Enbridge investments into oil pipelines. “It’s sort of a question of which infrastructure and jobs we want,”Michael Dahl, an Anishinaabe who works on the pipeline issues explains, “ if we want infrastructure for Enbridge, or infrastructure for our towns, cities and homes.”
The Enbridge Way
Enbridge is in the business of moving fossil fuels, and is intent upon the Great Lakes region. Their 50,000 miles of pipelines span the continent, but the stronghold for the 65 year old corporation is the Great Lakes. They are aggressive. “I got a call from the attorneys at Enbridge, recently , advising me that they are about to file a condemnation suit against us. This was followed by a fed ex package with a final offer … The Enbridge Attorneys said they could file their suit within a week or two I reiterated that I was not going to give them anything, they would have to take it.“
That’s James Botsford’s story, a Wisconsin Attorney and Supreme Court judge for the Mesquakie Nation. Botsford has a North Dakota farm, which he inherited from his parents, back a few generations before that. Botsford is facing Enbridge on the Sandpiper line, an entirely new line they would like to push across the north. He is looking at a huge legal battle, and Enbridge has told him directly “ our rights trump your rights”, after the company filed a restraining order against Botsford to prevent him from enjoying his own land. The Sandpiper , as a new line, is very contentious, as the other Enbridge lines all cross Red Lake, Leech lake and Fond du Lac reservations, along the Highway 2 Corridor. This one is new terrain, through the south, and across North Dakota.
At last count, Enbridge needs 2000 easements and rights of way, and a lot of permits for the Sandpiper. All of those can be difficult to get , denied or challenged. Besides that, the Sandpiper is proposed to cross 137 public lands, including Mississippi Headwaters State Forest, and 76 public waterways. That is a lot of public water and treaty protected water. And, the company is proceeding confidently… without an approved route, clearing land, setting up outposts, etc.
This is only a portion of the original article. Read the full thing here.

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New Report: Health Effects Associated with Chemical Emissions from NYS Natural Gas Compressor Stations: 2008-2014

October 12 – Today, EHP releases its groundbreaking report on the chemical and particulate emissions of the 18 largest compressor stations in New York State (NYS). It outlines in specific detail what companies are required to report to the NY Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and National Emissions Inventory (NEI) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the potential health effects of the 70 chemicals catalogued. This is the first time emissions data and their health effects have been compiled side-by-side raising questions about how residents’ health is impacted in communities close to the facilities.
EHP and the Health Advocates of New York who held a press and legislative briefing about the report this morning, recognize that it will play a central role in communities, NGOs, and health care professionals that decision-making.
Read the full report here.

Jobs


MA Community Organizer
Mothers Out Front : Mobilizing For A Livable Climate | Worcester, MA

Position Summary:  The Massachusetts Community Organizer builds and supports volunteer-led community teams to grow a diverse and powerful movement of mothers that develops and implements campaigns to achieve a swift, complete, and just transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. Specifically, the Community Organizer works to:

  1. Identify mothers, grandmothers and other caregivers in Worcester and Central Massachusetts who share Mothers Out Front’s goals and are willing to take action to reduce climate change;

  2. Support the creation of member-led teams in diverse communities in Worcester and Central Massachusetts by helping to organize house parties and coaching team leaders and potential leaders;

  3. Support member-led teams to launch and carry out local Mothers Out Front campaigns;

  4. Connect local teams to state campaigns and national Mothers Out Front movement work across states; and

  5. Provide “in-the-background” support and training to team members to strengthen their leadership skills, including their use of data and technology to support organizing.

READ THE FULL JOB DESCRIPTION & APPLY HERE


Government Relations Specialist
The Nature Conservancy | Boston, MA

The Nature Conservancy in Massachusetts is hiring a Government Relations Specialist to work alongside our Government Relations Director.

  • Influence the outcomes of federal and state public policy initiatives to further the Conservancy’s mission to conserve the lands and waters on which all life depends.
  • Collaborate in strategic partnerships with the policymakers, agencies, conservation organizations, and associations.
  • Coordinate with multidisciplinary staff to develop creative solutions to complex policy challenges.

Details:

  • The position is full time and based in Boston, with travel to DC expected.
  • Please see the full job description and apply here (Note: please use the on-line application)
  • Application Deadline: October 24, 2017 

Event Planner
Wild & Scenic Westfield River Committee | Westfield, MA 

In 2018, the Westfield River will be celebrating its 25th Anniversary since being designated as a National Wild & Scenic River. This happens to coincide with the 50th Anniversary of the National Wild & Scenic Rivers Act. As we near a quarter century of protecting the Westfield River and half century of protecting some of the greatest rivers in the United States, we hope to celebrate the accomplishments of the National Wild & Scenic Rivers System with a series of events and promotional materials. The Wild & Scenic Westfield River Committee seeks an Event Planner to assist us with our 25th and 50th Wild & Scenic Anniversaries outreach and events in 2018. Proposals will be accepted until filled with an initial review to begin on September 28th, 2017. RFQ Details here.


 Environmental Health Manager
Pioneer Valley Asthma Coalition | Springfield, MA

Primary Objective
Partners for a Healthier Communities (PHC)’ Environmental Health Manager (listed on the Baystate Health website (as “Community Health Planning/Environmental Health) is responsible for the planning, program development, and evaluation of environmental health and other projects, including assistance to subcontractors and community partners allied with the agency in this these efforts. The environmental health initiative will focus on a variety of types of projects, including the management of the Pioneer Valley Asthma Coalition, systems and policy change, and collective impact. The Environmental Health Manager will cultivate and strengthen strategic community partnerships and alliances between local, regional, and state-level coalitions and advocacy organizations; community-based nonprofit corporations; and business, social, educational, and health entities.

Role of the Environmental Health Manager
The position’s role typically involves grantwriting and reporting, leading environmental health projects, and convening as necessary community partners and clients to achieve the needed goals of projects.  Partnerships could be with sectors such as faith, business, education, academic, healthcare, social sector entities.

In particular, the position implements programming for initiatives to improve the health of people enrolled in the project:

  1. Develops programs and services that promote best and emerging practices for the environmental health area.  Designs and implements collaborative strategies with community partners and collaborators such as  social organizations, faith communities, community-based organizations and so on;
  2. Assists in strategic thinking, research and evaluation and program planning to achieve the corporation’s strategic goals and objectives assigned to the Consultant.  In this area, the Consultant is primarily responsible for implementing strategies such as providing training and technical assistance to help prioritize issues and develop community partnerships, utilizing data to execute new initiatives, evaluate results and communicate progress.
  3. Provides facilitative leadership to fellow community leaders, and offers opportunities and/or shares experiences, perspectives and expertise on issues such as partnership development, meeting planning, facilitation, and conflict management;
  4. Provides facilitative leadership to the project team in action planning including steps and/or activities to address the priority areas, and implementing actions with a timeline, identifiable milestones and evaluation measures;
  5. Oversee subcontractors when necessary and student interns;

Performance Expectations
It is expected that the Environmental Health Manager will work under the general supervision of the Director of Programs & Development.

The Environmental Health Manager’s work entails the day-to-day management (including planning, directing and organizing staff, programming and funding responsibility) of Environmental Health programs and activities.

  1. Programs will meet the objective of the strategic goals and objectives of PHC.
  2. Coalition-building activities will adhere to PHC standards.
  3. In establishing community programs, planning will adhere to a community health planning methodology and the planning processes will result in high quality successful programs.
  4. Community programs and issues will undergo regular assessments and review based on published reports on internal and external environmental issues related to the corporations health priority areas.

Education and Experience

  • Bachelor’s Degree in Public Health, Public Administration, Public Policy or related field required.  Master’s level college degree in these areas is preferred.
  • Applicant must have five years of relevant experience in a role of a program manager or supervisor in a public health or human service program. Five years of relevant experience in a role equivalent to a Program Director of a major public health program is preferred.

Core Competencies
The high visibility of this position, both internally and externally, requires that the Environmental Health Manager have

  • Experience designing and implementing program and initiative planning;
  • Highly proficient writing skills;
  • Strong interpersonal, facilitation and collaborative planning skills;
  • Proven abilities to work with and within teams;
  • Strong written and oral communication skills; bilingual preferred
  • A high degree of computer literacy;
  • Demonstrated use of community problem-solving skills;
  • Demonstrated facilitative leadership experiences in a community setting; and
  • Strong understanding of the public health environment (including asthma and environmental health) and the healthcare environment.
  • Strong public presentation skills

About Partners for a Healthier Community
Partners for a Healthier Community, the Public Health Institute of Western Massachusetts, provides skills, expertise and experience to create successful public health campaigns and sustainable system changes to improve health and well-being in Western MA. Through partnerships, we build on community assets and build community capacity to positively impact social determinants of health. Our services include Research and Assessment, Coalition-building, Program Evaluation and Health Policy Development. PHC is a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit with a 20 member Board of Directors and relies on state, federal and private grants and contracts. PHC contracts with Baystate Health for Human Resources services.

TO APPLY: Candidates for PHC’s Environmental Health Manager (Community Health Planning Consultant/Environmental Health) should apply through Baystate Health’s job portal at https://www.baystatehealthjobs.com/job/springfield/community-health-planning-consultant-environmental-health-full-time/156/5671580


Campus Organizer
PIRG Campus Action | Western MA

FULL TIME CAREER POSITION
At PIRG Campus Action, our full time organizers work on college campuses across the country to empower students to make a difference on critical environmental and social issues.

If we’re serious about climate change, we can’t afford to drag our feet—so we’re pushing cities and states to commit to 100% renewable energy, now. We rely on bees to pollinate our food, yet we’re allowing some pesticides to drive them toward extinction—so we’re working to ban these bee-killing pesticides. People in our communities and even students on college campuses are dealing with hunger and homelessness that affect their quality of life. We’re raising funds, toiletries, and food items for our local relief agencies – as well as holding fundraisers for Hurricane Relief for the communities in TX, FL, and the Caribbean who were hit from the recent natural disasters.

We’re looking for an individual who has the passion and the drive it takes to win positive change on these important issues, and who isn’t afraid of hard work. Ideally, this person has experience working on campaigns or with groups on campus. Our Berkshires organizer will mobilize a team of passionate students to run a campus chapter on two campuses in Western MA. You’ll recruit dozens of students to volunteer and get involved, and teach them how to plan and run effective campaigns through internships and on-the-ground training.

You’ll build relationships with faculty and administrators, while organizing news events and rallies, and generating the grassroots support it takes to win campaigns. During the summer, you’ll run a citizen outreach office, building the organization by canvassing and training others to canvass. And you’ll learn from some of the best organizers in the country—people who have been doing this work for more than 30 years.

Location: Western MA (organizing at Berkshire Community College and Mass College of Liberal Arts)
We’re also hiring organizers to work on college campuses in California, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Oregon and a few other states.

Pay & benefits
The target annual compensation for this position is $25,500 in the first year. PIRG Campus Action offers a competitive benefits package. We also offer an excellent training program and opportunities for advancement.

Apply here today or contact [email protected] directly with any inquiries or recommendations for candidates.


Regional Recycling Coordinator
City of Pittsfield | Pittsfield, MA

The Municipal Assistance Coordinator for the Western District (WE) provides technical assistance to municipalities to increase recycling, composting, waste reduction, household hazardous waste diversion and regional cooperation.  The City of Pittsfield has been awarded a Host Community grant from the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (MassDEP) to fund this position.

The Coordinator will act under the supervision of the MassDEP and will serve 100 municipalities in a district known as “Western”.  The district extends from Ware to Richmond.  For a map and list of communities in the district, please visit: http://www.mass.gov/dep/recycle/reduce/macmap.htm

This is an independent contractor position.  The position is funded at 36 hours per week, with an annual ceiling of 1,800 hours.  Annual compensation is commensurate with experience, starting at not less than $55,000.  An additional $5,000 annual reimbursement is provided for self-employment tax (Social Security and Medicare). Use of personal vehicle is required.  Vehicle mileage, tolls and parking =will be reimbursed.  Limited funding for in-state professional conferences is also provided.

DEADLINE TO APPLY:  Friday, September 8, 2017 @ 4:00PM
Full listing and application details here.


Conservation Projects Manager
Housatonic Valley Association | Cornwall Bridge, CT

The Housatonic Valley Association (HVA) is seeking a highly motivated, detail-oriented environmental professional to join our Watershed Conservation Team. The successful candidate will support all aspects of HVA’s conservation projects, which include (but aren’t limited to) environmental monitoring, regional road-stream crossing assessment and replacement planning, watershed management planning, stream corridor restoration, stormwater management through Green Infrastructure development, and environmental education. This position is based out of HVA’s Connecticut office.

This is only a part of the job description. To view the full descriptions and to apply, click here.


Director of Ecological Restoration
MA Department of Fish & Game | Boston, MA

The Division of Ecological Restoration is charged with restoring and protecting the health and integrity of the Commonwealth’s rivers, wetlands, and watersheds for the benefit of people and the environment. This mission is critical to the success of the Department of Fish and Game that manages, protects, and restores the natural resources of the Commonwealth.

The Division of Ecological Restoration works with community-based partners to restore aquatic ecosystems. The Division’s ecological restoration work brings clean water, recreation opportunities, and other ecosystem services to the citizens of Massachusetts.

The Director leads the Division of Ecological Restoration, one of three Divisions (and one Office) of the Department of Fish and Game. The Director is responsible for all functions and program performance ensuring that the Deputy Director is properly managing the day-today operations of the Division and the assistant director is administering annual budgets properly. The Director develops and makes sure the annual and five-year strategic plan goals are implemented and sets procedures and program priorities for the Deputy Director and Assistant Director to faithfully administer. The Director oversees development of the operational and capital budgets and manages a diverse staff.

This is only a small part of the job description. Click here to read the full description and to apply. 


Various Positions at Co-op Power

Co-op Power in Florence, MA, is hiring for:

  • Chief Executive Officer
  • Energy Efficiency Program Manager
  • Community Solar Program Director
  • Energy Efficiency Intern
  • Community Solar Interns

Full details and how to apply here.

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2017-18 Position Openings with TerraCorps – Various locations

TerraCorps, formerly MassLIFT-AmeriCorps, is an innovative national service program helping communities conserve and secure land for the health and well-being of people and nature. This year we are looking for 36 members to serve in full-time, 11 month positions. Members will carry out capacity building projects; educate or train individuals; recruit, train, manage, and support community volunteers engaged in land-based activities; and identify new individuals and groups to participate in education, recreation, or service opportunities centered around land access and conservation.

Members serve as: Land Stewardship Coordinators, Regional Conservation Coordinators, Youth Education Coordinators, or Community Engagement Coordinators.

These 1,700 hour AmeriCorps positions receive a living allowance, education award, and additional AmeriCorps benefits. The 2017-2018 program will run from 8/28/17 – 7/27/18.

Application specifics, position descriptions, and information about organizations hosting TerraCorps members can be found at here.

Applications will be accepted until all positions are filled.

AmeriCorps programs provide equal service opportunities. TerraCorps will recruit and select persons in all positions to ensure a diverse and inclusive climate without regard to any particular status. We encourage applications from individuals with disabilities and will provide reasonable accommodations for interviews and service upon request. TerraCorps is a grant program of the Corporation for National and Community Service.

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 Various Positions
The Manice Education Center (MEC) | Florida, MA

The Manice Education Center (MEC) is intentionally located in a unique outdoor setting within the heart of the Berkshire Mountains of Western Massachusetts. MEC operates several distinctly different seasonal programs that are experientially focused in high-quality environmental education, wilderness camping, and leadership training.

Summer Outdoor educators will lead wilderness expeditions for campers & can expect to guide an average of 6 backpacking and/or canoeing trips, ranging from 2 to 5 days in length.  Expedition locations inlude the Appalachian Trail, Long Trail, Savoy Mountain State Forest, Taconic Trail, Battenkill River, Deerfield River, & Connecticut River. Educators receive training in backpacking and wilderness navigation, participate in a 2 day professional canoe clinic, & can earn free certifications in Wildernes First Aid and/or Waterfront Lifeguarding.

APPLY TODAY – SEND US A COVER LETTER AND RESUME TO [email protected] 

For more details please visit our Jobs page (click here).

Please share this opportunity with your friends and colleagues! If you have any questions about employment in Christodora programs, please contact Matthew Scholl, Programs Director at 413.663.8463 or email us at [email protected]

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Volunteer Opportunities with The Trustees

HAUNTED HOUSE TOUR GUIDES

Naumkeag’s 2nd Annual Haunted House will take place on 10/20, 10/21, 10/27, and 10/28 and we are seeking volunteer groups to serve as characters in the house during one of those nights! Costumes are provided and the training is simple-no acting experience is required.   5pm-9:30pm.

Visit www.thetrustees.org/volunteer or contact [email protected] or 413.213.4248 for more information.

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